The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries

The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries

Author: Donald R. Prothero

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231546461

Category: Science

Page: 472

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Today, any kid can rattle off the names of dozens of dinosaurs. But it took centuries of scientific effort—and a lot of luck—to discover and establish the diversity of dinosaur species we now know. How did we learn that Triceratops had three horns? Why don’t many paleontologists consider Brontosaurus a valid species? What convinced scientists that modern birds are relatives of ancient Velociraptor? In The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries, Donald R. Prothero tells the fascinating stories behind the most important fossil finds and the intrepid researchers who unearthed them. In twenty-five vivid vignettes, he weaves together dramatic tales of dinosaur discoveries with what modern science now knows about the species to which they belong. Prothero takes us from eighteenth-century sightings of colossal bones taken for biblical giants through recent discoveries of enormous predators even larger than Tyrannosaurus. He recounts the escapades of the larger-than-life personalities who made modern paleontology, including scientific rivalries like the nineteenth-century “Bone Wars.” Prothero also details how to draw the boundaries between species and explores debates such as whether dinosaurs had feathers, explaining the findings that settled them or keep them going. Throughout, he offers a clear and rigorous look at what paleontologists consider sound interpretation of evidence. An essential read for any dinosaur lover, this book teaches us to see an ancient world ruled by giant majestic creatures anew.
Romancing the Birds and Dinosaurs
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: Alan Feduccia
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-15 - Publisher: BrownWalker Press

Birds and dinosaurs have dominated human interest for decades. In this well-supported revolutionary view of the field, critical questions are explored with credible evidence and biological thought. Are birds derived directly from advanced dinosaurs, or are they closely related dinosaur cousins? Did flight originate via the natural "gravity-assisted" trees-down model,
The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries
Language: en
Pages: 472
Authors: Donald R. Prothero
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-07-16 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

Today, any kid can rattle off the names of dozens of dinosaurs. But it took centuries of scientific effort—and a lot of luck—to discover and establish the diversity of dinosaur species we now know. How did we learn that Triceratops had three horns? Why don’t many paleontologists consider Brontosaurus a
Dinosaurs by the Decades: A Chronology of the Dinosaur in Science and Popular Culture
Language: en
Pages: 473
Authors: Randy Moore
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-07-23 - Publisher: ABC-CLIO

Providing an appealing chronology of "all things dinosaur," this book covers these ancient creatures' roles and surprising importance in science, religion, and society at large. • Depicts the history, breadth, depth, and diversity of how humans have learned about, argued over, and made use of dinosaurs—a resource appropriate for public,
Cut and Make Dinosaur Masks
Language: en
Pages: 6
Authors: Christy Shaffer
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-03-31 - Publisher: Courier Corporation

Complete instructions for cutting out and assembling dramatic face masks of 11 prehistoric predators, including a toothy Tyrannosaurus Rex, the two-ridged Dilophosaurus, Ichthyosaurus — the "fish lizard" — Pachycephalosaurus, affectionately nicknamed "bonehead," and 7 other awesome creatures.
Learning Conversations in Museums
Language: en
Pages: 480
Authors: Gaea Leinhardt, Kevin Crowley, Karen Knutson
Categories: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-01-30 - Publisher: Taylor & Francis

What do people learn from visiting museums and how do they learn it? The editors approach this question by focusing on conversations as both the process and the outcome of museum learning. People do not come to museums to talk, but they often do talk. This talk can drift from