Exploding the Phone

Exploding the Phone

Author: Phil Lapsley

Publisher: Grove Press

ISBN: 0802122280

Category: History

Page: 414

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Describes how "phone phreaks" learned how to make illicit but technologically innovative free phone calls and shared the technique, and places the process in the development of telecommunications and the behavior of the telephone monopoly.
Exploding the Phone
Language: en
Pages: 414
Authors: Phil Lapsley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014 - Publisher: Grove Press

Describes how "phone phreaks" learned how to make illicit but technologically innovative free phone calls and shared the technique, and places the process in the development of telecommunications and the behavior of the telephone monopoly.
Exploding the Phone
Language: en
Pages: 416
Authors: Phil Lapsley
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-02-05 - Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

“A rollicking history of the telephone system and the hackers who exploited its flaws.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review Before smartphones, back even before the Internet and personal computers, a misfit group of technophiles, blind teenagers, hippies, and outlaws figured out how to hack the world’s largest machine: the telephone system.
The Exploding Problem of Telephone Slamming in America
Language: en
Pages: 333
Authors: U. S. Government Staff, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Governmental Affairs. Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations
Categories: Fraud
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998 - Publisher:

Books about The Exploding Problem of Telephone Slamming in America
Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: United States. Patent Office
Categories: Patents
Type: BOOK - Published: 1900 - Publisher:

Books about Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office
Exploding Data
Language: en
Pages: 254
Authors: Michael Chertoff
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-08-02 - Publisher: Atlantic Books

A powerful argument for new laws and policies regarding cyber-security, from the former US Secretary of Homeland Security. The most dangerous threat we-individually and as a society-face today is no longer military, but rather the increasingly pervasive exposure of our personal information; nothing undermines our freedom more than losing control