The Courts and Social Policy
Language: en
Pages: 309
Authors: Donald L. Horowitz
Categories: Judicial process
Type: BOOK - Published: 1977 - Publisher:

Books about The Courts and Social Policy
Courts and Social Policy
Language: en
Pages: 309
Authors: Donald L. Horowitz
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-12-10 - Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

In recent years, the power of American judges to make social policy has been significantly broadened. The courts have reached into many matters once thought to be beyond the customary scope of judicial decisionmaking: education and employment policy, environmental issues, prison and hospital management, and welfare administration—to name a few.
The Limits of Social Policy
Language: en
Pages: 215
Authors: Nathan Glazer, Professor of Education and Sociology Emeritus Nathan Glazer
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

Criticizes current social policies suggests new policies tha would strengthen social structures and values, and describes ways to reinforce the incentive to work
Welfare Rights and Social Policy
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Hartley Dean
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-06-06 - Publisher: Routledge

Welfare Rights and Social Policy provides an introduction to social policy through a discussion of welfare rights, which are explored in historical, comparative and critical context. At a time when the cause of human rights is high on the global political agendathe authorasks why the status of welfare rights as
May It Please the Court
Language: en
Pages: 380
Authors: Brian L. Porto
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-10-17 - Publisher: CRC Press

Despite their clarity and sophistication, most judicial process texts currently available have two significant limitations. First, they understate the effects of legal factors such as stare decisis on judicial decision-making and second, they fail to convey the human emotions involved in litigation. Reflecting the author’s experience as a political scientist,