The Reality of the Unobservable

The Reality of the Unobservable

Author: E. Agazzi

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401593915

Category: Science

Page: 378

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Observability and Scientific Realism It is commonly thought that the birth of modern natural science was made possible by an intellectual shift from a mainly abstract and specuJative conception of the world to a carefully elaborated image based on observations. There is some grain of truth in this claim, but this grain depends very much on what one takes observation to be. In the philosophy of science of our century, observation has been practically equated with sense perception. This is understandable if we think of the attitude of radical empiricism that inspired Ernst Mach and the philosophers of the Vienna Circle, who powerfully influenced our century's philosophy of science. However, this was not the atti tude of the f ounders of modern science: Galileo, f or example, expressed in a f amous passage of the Assayer the conviction that perceptual features of the world are merely subjective, and are produced in the 'anima!' by the motion and impacts of unobservable particles that are endowed uniquely with mathematically expressible properties, and which are therefore the real features of the world. Moreover, on other occasions, when defending the Copernican theory, he explicitly remarked that in admitting that the Sun is static and the Earth turns on its own axis, 'reason must do violence to the sense' , and that it is thanks to this violence that one can know the tme constitution of the universe.
The Reality of the Unobservable
Language: en
Pages: 378
Authors: E. Agazzi, M. Pauri
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-04-17 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

Observability and Scientific Realism It is commonly thought that the birth of modern natural science was made possible by an intellectual shift from a mainly abstract and specuJative conception of the world to a carefully elaborated image based on observations. There is some grain of truth in this claim, but
The Reality of the Unobservable
Language: en
Pages: 365
Authors: Evandro Agazzi, M. Pauri
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-07-31 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

The debate on realism in physics is usually focused on the reality of unobservable entities admitted in physical theories. This reality has been often denied (e.g., by Bas van Fraassen). The present book shows that observability is a very complex notion that does not really have direct implications on ontological
Fact and Method
Language: en
Pages: 628
Authors: Richard W. Miller
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-13 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

In this bold work, of broad scope and rich erudition, Richard Miller sets out to reorient the philosophy of science. By questioning both positivism and its leading critics, he develops new solutions to the most urgent problems about justification, explanation, and truth. Using a wealth of examples from both the
Einstein, Tagore and the Nature of Reality
Language: en
Pages: 238
Authors: Partha Ghose
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-06-23 - Publisher: Routledge

The nature of reality has been a long-debated issue among scientists and philosophers. In 1930, Rabindranath Tagore and Albert Einstein had a long conversation on the nature of reality. This conversation has been widely quoted and discussed by scientists, philosophers and scholars from the literary world. The important question that
The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics
Language: en
Pages: 266
Authors: Bryce Seligman Dewitt, Neill Graham
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-03-08 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

A novel interpretation of quantum mechanics, first proposed in brief form by Hugh Everett in 1957, forms the nucleus around which this book has developed. In his interpretation, Dr. Everett denies the existence of a separate classical realm and asserts the propriety of considering a state vector for the whole